Ivy Studio installs colourful marble in Montreal’s Hayat restaurant

Hayat restaurant by Ivy Studio

Montreal-based Ivy Studio has chosen a variety of dramatic marble to outfit a Middle Eastern restaurant, which features a colour palette influenced by “the earthy tones of the Syrian deserts”.

In Montreal’s Old Port neighbourhood, the 1,500-square-foot (140-square metre) Hayat restaurant is designed to reflect the cuisine served by chef Joseph Awad.

Entrance to Hayat restaurant with marble host stand in foreground
The marble host stand at Hayat sets the tone for the restaurant’s Middle Eastern-influenced colour palette

“This Middle Eastern restaurant’s colour palette was inspired by the earthy tones of the Syrian deserts and their surrounding greenery,” said Ivy Studio.

Upon entering is a screen of black hammered-glass panels, which also conceals the kitchen in the far corner.

Dining room with marble topped tables, green chairs and cream walls
In the main dining space, banquette seating runs along two walls below a fabric ceiling installation

In the main dining room, built-in benches form an L along two walls, while a pair of U-shaped booths sit against another that arches over them.

The seat backs are upholstered in mauve velvet and the cushions are wrapped in contrasting deep green leather.

Private booths positioned below an arched ceiling and behind a partition of black hammered glass
Private booths are positioned below an arched ceiling and behind a partition of black hammered glass

Closer to the kitchen is another small, semi-circular booth built into the walnut millwork.

Here the cushioned seats are covered in ruby-toned velvet, and a metallic light fixture is suspended above.

The bar counter made from teal, pistachio and cream-coloured marble
The bar is made from a dramatic marble variety with streaks of teal, pistachio and cream colours

Ivy Studio selected a wide variety of striking, richly veined marbles, “each contributing their own touch of colour into the space” according to the team.

The bar is made from a dramatic stone with teal, cream and pistachio striations, while the host stand and dining table tops in the main area are purple and white.

A red-hued semicircular booth tucked into walnut millwork
A red-hued semicircular booth is tucked into the walnut millwork close to the kitchen

The building’s exposed brickwork is painted cream to match the other walls, while the original historic stone between the large windows is left exposed.

“The ancient stone walls at the front and rear facades were left intact to showcase the building’s history,” Ivy Studio said.

Curved layers across the ceiling, which hide indirect lighting, are designed to evoke the smooth landscapes of the Middle East.

A fabric installation suspended above the dining tables curves around more strips of lighting, diffusing the light to create a warm glow.

Bar made from a dramatic marble variety with streaks of teal, pistachio and cream colours
The bar is made from a dramatic marble variety with streaks of teal, pistachio and cream colours

Walnut, stone and cream walls are also found in the bathrooms, which echo the colour and material scheme throughout the restaurant.

“The overall intention of the palette was to bring together the worlds of Middle Eastern nature and Old Montreal construction,” the studio said.

Hayat restaurant by Ivy Studio
The same material palette continues in the moody bathrooms

Ivy Studio has completed several interiors across Montreal that include colourful marble.

These include the Italian restaurant Piatti where the dark green stone contrasts the building’s rough walls and co-working office Spatial where purple surfaces pop against mint green millwork.

The photography is by Alex Lesage.


Project credits:

Architecture and design: Ivy Studio
Construction: Groupe Manovra

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Branding and Visual Identity for Artisan Focaccia Pop-Up

Branding and Visual Identity for Artisan Focaccia Pop-Up

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Explore how Glad’s artisan di recco style focaccia pop-up in Los Angeles enhances its branding and visual identity through innovative design and a flexible brand ethos, captivating food lovers and markets alike.

In the bustling streets of Los Angeles, a unique pop-up restaurant, Glad, is making waves with its artisan di recco style focaccias. The brilliance behind Glad’s branding and visual identity, crafted by Ozan Karako, showcases the essence of creativity and adaptability in the culinary world. At the heart of Glad’s concept is the stretchy dough, a masterpiece of texture and flexibility, masterfully handcrafted by Chef Cihan. This dough, thin, flexible, and dynamic, inspired the foundational elements of Glad’s brand identity.

Glad represents more than just a dining experience; it’s a testament to the adaptability and fluidity of modern culinary ventures. Pop-up restaurants, by their nature, embody flexibility and ease of adaptation. Glad takes this to the next level, capable of transforming any space, from the most popular food markets like Smorgasburg to private events, into a gourmet experience within half an hour. This inherent adaptability influenced the creation of a flexible brand identity for Glad, one that evolves organically across different marketing materials while maintaining its core essence through a distinctive red and beige color scheme and a unique handwritten wordmark.

The design strategy employed by Karako for Glad is a masterclass in branding and visual identity. It underlines the importance of having a central, inspiring element—in this case, the dough—that defines and differentiates the brand. The color scheme and wordmark are not just visual elements; they are a narrative, telling the story of Glad’s artisanal quality, flexibility, and innovative spirit.

For designers and brands looking to make a mark, Glad’s approach provides valuable insights. It demonstrates how a well-thought-out branding strategy can elevate a product, making it memorable and engaging for its audience. By focusing on the essence of what they offer and how it’s presented, brands can create a visual identity that resonates deeply with their customers, paving the way for success in a competitive landscape.

Glad’s story is a reminder that at the intersection of design and culinary art, there’s an opportunity to create something truly unique. Through strategic branding and a clear visual identity, Glad not only serves delicious focaccia but also a lasting impression.

Branding and visual identity artifacts

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For more information make sure to check out Ozan Karako on Behance. 

HONOR recreates porsche 911 sports car into foldable smartphone and more at MWC 2024

alongside porsche design smartphones, HONOR unveils AI that learns the users’ behavior, a scratch-resistant screen glass that uses cars’ coating, and more at MWC 2024.

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atelier prototipi bathes futuristic LAB I boutique in hues of purple and gray

Lab l is a start-up project of a box-shop for the unrestricted purchase / sale of rare and conceptual garments. By its structure, the space is configured to facilitate a closer contact between the buyer and the product without a third party. The interior architecture in this scenario goes beyond local solutions, turning into a changeable relevant process.

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Medprostor tops 12th-century church in Slovenia with folding roof

Žiče Charterhouse by Medprostor in Slovenia

Local studio Medprostor has covered and partially repaired a 900-year-old Romanesque church in Slovenia, placing an operable roof on top of the open structure to create a space “between a ruin and a reconstruction”.

Medprostor crafted a series of modest interventions alongside the folding roof that aim to protect the significant monastic building, located inside the fortified grounds of the historic Žiče Charterhouse.

The repairs and alterations were also intended to improve its functionality for tourism and events.

Roof and lookout at Žiče Charterhouse church by Medprostor in Slovenia
Medprostor has topped a 12th-century church with a folding roof in Slovenia

According to the studio, the project was conceived to protect the church’s immaterial qualities as an ancient and sacred place, in addition to preserving its physical remains.

“The construction and restoration interventions were carried out in such a way that they enable a chronological reading of the 900-year-old sacral space,” Medprostor cofounder Jerneja Fischer Knap told Dezeen.

“[The design] fully conforms to the requirements of heritage protection for reversibility, with less invasive and less intense interventions,” he continued.

Blackened wood and steel roof over church in Žiče Charterhouse by Medprostor in Slovenia
The half-gable roof structure spans the length of the church and can be opened to the sky

“The largest intervention was the covering of the existing building with a semi-movable, folding roof,” Knap said.

“When lowered, it enables the smooth running of events in the church regardless of the season and weather, while when raised, it preserves one of the most important intangible moments of the ruin: contact with the open sky.”

Lightweight black steel, blackened wood and dark slate tiles make up the half-gable roof system, distinguishing the gesture from the church’s original masonry architecture.

Medprostor also chose restrained and rectilinear geometries for its interventions, seeking to establish a low-tech aesthetic language that could sit harmoniously against the heritage structures.

“The roof, together with its details and proportions is related to the key architectural elements of the whole church,” Knap explained. “And yet, it can also act as an illusion – a spectre in harmony with the open, ephemeral character of the ruin… [a] space between a ruin and a reconstruction.”

Open roof and ruins of the church at Žiče Charterhouse by Medprostor in Slovenia
A dark, uniform material palette defines the interventions across the church

The studio reconstructed a demolished portion of the church’s walls and flooring, while spiral staircases were placed into existing vertical shafts to reconnect visitors to an upper-level viewing platform.

“Two staircases are connected to a new lookout point with a narrow, slightly sloping corridor leading up to it, framed by the outer faces of the [reconstructed] north wall,” Knap explained.

“The lookout point offers an essential view from above of the northern part of the monastery complex and its ruined character.”

Repaired wall and raised flooring in church at the Žiče Charterhouse by Medprostor in Slovenia
The studio made limited repairs to the ruins, including reconstructing its partially collapsed northern wall

Slovenian architecture studio Medprostor was established by Knap, Rok Žnidaršič and Samo Mlakar in 2011, with projects spanning across the public and private sectors.

Medprostor’s interventions at Žiče Charterhouse were shortlisted for the 2024 European Mies van der Rohe Award, which has previously been won by Grafton Architects for its colonnaded teaching building for Kingston University in London.

The seven finalists for the 2024 Mies van der Rohe Award were recently revealed to include The Reggio School by Andrés Jaque, a copper-clad convent in France and a library by SUMA Arquitectura in Spain.

The photography is by Miran Kambič.

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Eight tranquil interiors where oversized windows frame lush views

Kitchen interior of Well House by Memo Architectuur

This week’s lookbook explores eight peaceful residential interiors that feature expansive glazing and floor-to-ceiling windows framing verdant views.

These eight projects all use oversized or unusually shaped windows in clever ways, creating interiors that embrace nature and forge welcome connections to the outdoors.

Among this list of projects is an urban home renovation in Sydney offering scenic views over a plant-filled roof terrace, a curvaceous home that wraps around mango trees in a forest near Mumbai, and a mid-century home renovation sat beside a hillside in California.

This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration see previous lookbooks featuring interiors that embody the “bookshelf wealth” design trend, living spaces that feature metal furniture and offbeat homes with indoor slides.


Ground floor, Casa Tres Árboles in Valle de Bravo by Direccion
Photo by Fabian Martinez

Casa Tres Árboles, Mexico, by Direccion

Neutral calming tones feature throughout this revamp of a weekend retreat in Valle de Bravo, completed by Mexican studio Direccion.

Designed to “convey a sense of refuge and retreat”, lush courtyards at either end of the home serve as a backdrop to the calm interiors and are visible through floor-to-ceiling windows and French doors.

Find out more about Casa Tres Árboles ›


Hidden Garden House in Sydney designed by Sam Crawford Architects
Photo by Tom Ferguson

Hidden Garden House, Australia, by Sam Crawford Architects

Located within a conservation zone, this Sydney home was reconfigured by Sam Crawford Architects to transform the space into an urban “sanctuary”.

A sloped terrace on the upper floor is filled with plants to create an “urban oasis” outside the house and offers a scenic yet private bathing experience for the residents.

Find out more about Hidden Garden House ›


Quincy Jones restoration
Photo by Nils Timm

12221 Benmore , US, by Ome Dezin

This mid-century home renovation in California by US studio Ome Dezin features a tonal colour palette and has oversized openings to maximise views of the lush hillside.

Originally constructed in 1960 by architects A Quincy Jones and Frederick Emmon, the renovation aimed to revive the home’s original charm and its connection to the outdoors.

Find out more about 12221 Benmore ›


Interior view of Nisarga Art Hub by Wallmakers in Kerala, India
Photo by Syam Sreesylam

Nisarga Art Hub, India, by Wallmakers

Nisarga Art Hub, a family home located in Kerala, doubles as a community arts centre for hosting workshops and events, as well as musical performances that are held on the structure’s innovative roof design.

A central space features earthy, natural interiors with built-in seating that is fronted by oversized windows looking out over the neighbouring paddy fields.

Find out more about Nisarga Art Hub ›


London home extension by Oliver Leech Architects
Photo by Jim Stephenson

Poet’s Corner House, UK, by Oliver Leech Architects

UK studio Oliver Leech Architects added a four-metre-wide skylight to this extension of a Victorian terrace house in south London.

Tasked with opening up the home’s dark interiors, the extension offers views of a wildflower meadow roof along with views out to a rear courtyard.

Find out more about Poet’s Corner House ›


Blurring Boundaries designs brick home nestled in Indian forest
Photo by Inclined Studio

Asmalay, India, by Blurring Boundaries

This curvaceous home near Mumbai completed by Indian studio Blurring Boundaries was designed to wrap around five of the surrounding forest’s mango trees.

Large, oval-shaped windows line the home’s interior and draw daylight in as well as provide views out towards the leafy forest.

Find out more about Asmalay ›


Well by Memo Architectuur in Mortsel, Belgium
Photo by Evenbeeld

Well House, Belgium, by Memo Architectuur

Belgian studio Memo Architectuur renovated this dilapidated row house in Mortsel to accommodate a single-family home.

The home’s bright, leafy interiors are lit by floor-to-ceiling rear openings that provide a picturesque backdrop to an open-plan kitchen and upper-floor balcony.

Find out more about Well House ›


Snohetta and Tor Helge Dokka design Norwegian residence
Photo by Robin Hayes

House Dokka, Norway, by Snøhetta

Two stacked timber-clad volumes comprise this home designed to resemble a “floating treehouse” in Kongsberg, Norway, completed by Snøhetta and Tor Helge Dokka.

Optimising its location perched on a hillside, large windows finished with black frames look out onto the surrounding rocky landscape.

Find out more about House Dokka ›

This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration see previous lookbooks featuring interiors that embody the “bookshelf wealth” design trend, living spaces that feature metal furniture and offbeat homes with indoor slides.

The post Eight tranquil interiors where oversized windows frame lush views appeared first on Dezeen.

Wendell Castle's stack-laminated furniture goes on display at Carpenters Workshop Gallery

Photo of Wendell Castle in his later years sitting on one of his large, black, biomorphic sculptures

The late works of American artist and designer Wendell Castle have gone on display at the Carpenters Workshop Gallery in London, showing the evolution of his signature stack-lamination technique.

Castle, who passed away in 2018 at the age of 85, is known as one of the pioneers of American art furniture, combining his training in both industrial design and sculpture to make one-off functional pieces.

Photo of Wendell Castle in his later years sitting on one of his large, black, biomorphic sculptures
The Suspended Disbelief exhibition showcases the late work of Wendell Castle. Photo by Jean Pierre Vaillancourt

The Carpenters Workshop Gallery solo exhibition Suspended Disbelief displays works the designer created between 2011 and 2015.

The period saw Castle return to the biomorphic style and stack-lamination technique that had characterised his most famous works of the 1960s and 70s, augmented with new ideas and technologies.

Photo of a black sculptural object with a large, tabletop-like surface extending from a collection of three, tentacle-like pillars rising from the floor
Castle’s work is mainly made of laminated wood

Stack lamination involves glueing planks of wood together to make a large block, which Castle would then carve into. The artist built the blocks with an idea of the work he was going to carve in mind, so he could build up the approximate shape in cross sections.

With his later series of works, he added another element: digital technologies such as 3D modelling, scanning and laser cutting. These allowed him to achieve ever more elaborate creations because he could obtain accurate cross-sections of 3D models in a way that he couldn’t from 2D drawings, and cut them equally precisely.

Timber stool in Carpenters Workshop Gallery exhibition
His signature forms are organic and biomorphic

“Scale and form could be pushed even further and with more complexity than ever before, resulting in the spectacular, large-scale works on show in the exhibition,” Carpenters Workshop Gallery co-founder Loïc Le Gaillard told Dezeen.

The works on show as part of Suspended Disbelief are elongated and multi-limbed, sometimes monumental. They emerge from the floor like creatures from the bowels of the earth.

Stained in a black finish, the organic forms have an enigmatic appearance and push the boundaries of what we understand as timber.

Works made in steel, bronze and nickel are also on display. But laminated wood is the material he most often returned to, appreciating the way it allowed him to sculpt complex forms while ensuring structural integrity.

Close-up photo of tentacle-like ends on a smooth, black sculpture
The wood is stained in a black finish

Castle explained that digital tools had allowed him unprecedented freedom in a video filmed by his daughter Alison Castle and gallery Friedman Benda before his death.

“Even though you think that you’re not designing with your abilities very much in mind, you are,” he said.

“Something just keeps you from designing things that you just could not possibly make, or you couldn’t possibly make in any reasonable way. You can kind of throw that out the window now.”

Photo of a sculptural seat at the Suspended Disbelief exhibition by Wendell Castle at the Carpenters Workshop Gallery, London
Castle was one of the pioneers of American art furniture

Carpenters Workshop Gallery has exhibited Castle’s work since the early 2000s – including solo shows in both London and Paris – and has continued to work with the artist’s estate since his death.

Le Gaillard said that it had been “a dream come true and a humbling experience” to work with Castle in his lifetime.

“Wendell emanated a sense of wisdom and humility,” said Le Gaillard. “He had limited opportunities to travel outside of his home in Kansas during his childhood, so he always said how incredible it was for him to be able to travel and show his work in places like London or Paris later in his career.”

Photo of a large, black sculpture made of bulbous and finger-like organic forms emerging from the ground
His works got more complex in his later years as he applied digital tools. Photo by John Pierre Vaillancourt

Le Gaillard founded the Carpenters Workshop Gallery with his childhood friend Julien Lombrail in 2006, starting in a literal carpenter’s workshop in London’s Mayfair.

The gallery specialises in functional art and collectible design and now has five galleries worldwide, including a new London space in Ladbroke Hall, Notting Hill.

Castle was interviewed by Dezeen in 2017, where he spoke about the “organic” vocabulary of his work. “Sometimes I think of it as actually growing from a seed/idea,” he said.

The photography is by Benjamin Baccarani unless otherwise stated.

Wendell Castle: Suspended Disbelief is on at the Carpenters Workshop Gallery in London, UK, from 9 February to 27 April 2024. See Dezeen Events Guide for an up-to-date list of architecture and design events taking place around the world.

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